Published: Tue, June 20, 2017
World | By Carl Welch

Rosenstein Says He Won't Fire Special Counsel Unless There's Good Cause

Rosenstein Says He Won't Fire Special Counsel Unless There's Good Cause

President Donald Trump has "no intention" of firing special counsel Robert Mueller who is investigating the alleged Russian meddling in last year's U.S. presidential polls, the White House has said.

"As long as I'm in this position, he's not going to be fired without good cause", Rosenstein said.

"I wouldn't say I was fighting with Sean Spicer", Ruddy said. (Trump has "no intention" of firing Mueller, White House spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders said last night).

Trump would either have to order deputy attorney general Rod Rosenstein to fire Mueller, or alternatively, repeal a set of 18-year-old regulations protecting the special counsel.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions who recused himself from participating in the Russian Federation probe, and as a result, Rosenstein is now the highest-ranking official at the Justice Department overseeing Mueller's Russian Federation probe.

Sessions then recused himself in March from overseeing the FBI's Russian Federation probe and delegated that authority to his new deputy attorney general, Rod J. Rosenstein.

The White House made clear - albeit not all that quickly - that Ruddy never met with President Trump on Monday and is, essentially, freelancing.

"I'm not going to follow any orders unless I believe those are lawful and appropriate orders", Rosenstein said.

Firing Comey and then Mueller would leave Trump with the reputation of a man who will keep dismissing anyone serious about conducting an honest investigation. She asked whether he has seen "any evidence of good cause" to fire Mueller.

High-profile supporters of President Donald Trump are turning on special counsel Robert Mueller, the man charged with investigating Russian interference in the US election and possible collusion with Trump's campaign. The CEO is Newsmax Media called Mueller "illegitimate" as a special counsel because the investigation itself has no basis.

House Speaker Paul Ryan, weighing in Tuesday morning, advised the White House and Trump to let the special counsel's investigation continue, and await vindication. Still, he said: "Bob Mueller did a great job as Federal Bureau of Investigation director". "I stand by that appointment".

"I think that Mueller shouldn't have taken the position", Ruddy said, "if he was under consideration and had a private conversation with the president and was privy maybe to some of his thoughts about that investigation or other matters before the bureau".

"I don't think Trump should do anything but the congressional Republicans ought to look into it", Gingrich said.

Ruddy lashed out at Spicer and the White House communications team in a Tuesday interview on MSNBC, calling their behavior "amateur hour" and accusing them of failing the president. Ruddy later confirmed the comment to CNN. "The best advice would be to let Robert Mueller do his job", he told reporters.

The former House speaker Newt Gingrich, an informal Trump adviser, tweeted on Monday: "Republicans are delusional if they think the special counsel is going to be fair".

"The chain of command for the special counsel is only directly to the attorney general - and in this case, the acting attorney general", he said.

The White House appeared blindsided by it, but took hours to address it, triggering speculation it was, one, a plan indeed and Moody was testing the waters for Trump, and two, it was an attempt by a anxious administration to intimidate the counsel and the formidable team of lawyers he was putting together. "No, I have not", Rosenstein said.

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