Published: Tue, September 12, 2017
World | By Carl Welch

Bangladesh offers land to shelter Rohingya fleeing Myanmar

Bangladesh offers land to shelter Rohingya fleeing Myanmar

In an address to the United Nations human rights council in Geneva, Zeid Ra'ad al-Hussein denounced the "brutal security operation" against the Rohingya in Rakhine state, which he said was "clearly disproportionate" to insurgent attacks carried out last month.

The United Nations says 294,000 bedraggled and exhausted Rohingya refugees have arrived in Bangladesh since the militants' attacks on Myanmar security forces in neighbouring Rakhine state on August 25 sparked a major military backlash.

Recep Tayyip Erdogan said in his speech at the summit, which is underway in Kazakhstan's capital of Astana, that Turkey had already notified Bangladesh, where many Rohingya refugees seek asylum, about its readiness to help.

"The situation seems a textbook example of ethnic cleansing".

Myanmar says its security forces are carrying out clearance operations to defend against ARSA, which the government has declared a terrorist organization.

"The Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army (ARSA) hereby declares a temporary cessation of offensive military operations", the group said in a statement on its Twitter account on Saturday.

In such a scenario, he also called on the OIC to hold an emergency session and Muslim countries to cut their diplomatic and trade ties with Myanmar to express their firm support for the oppressed and defenseless Rohingya Muslims.

Rumours have spread on social media that Muslims, who represent about 4.3 per cent of the Buddhist-majority country's population of 51.4 million, would stage attacks on September 11 to avenge violence against the Rohingya in northern Rakhine.

Zeid urged the Myanmar government to "stop pretending that the Rohingyas are setting fire to their own homes and laying waste to their own villages".

However, Myanmar's leader Aung San Suu Kyi has dismissed the Rohingya crisis as a misinformation campaign, rejecting the occurrence of any clampdown on the minority.

On Monday it emerged that the Dalai Lama had joined fellow Nobel peace laureates Malala Yousafzai and Archbishop Desmond Tutu in urging Suu Kyi to intervene.

Monday's estimate of new arrivals in the Cox's Bazar region of Bangladesh since August 25 was 313,000, an increase of 19,000 in just 24 hours.

The State Department is working with worldwide partners, including the Office of the United Nations' refugee agency, the global Committee of the Red Cross and the worldwide Organization for Migration, to provide emergency assistance for the displaced, the statement said.

"New arrivals in all locations are in urgent need of life-saving assistance, including food, water and sanitation, health and protection".

At the makeshift camp near Shamlapur, Rohingya refugees doubted a ceasefire would allow their return any time soon.

She told AFP it had taken her 15 days to reach Bangladesh from her village south of Maungdaw, where her husband and three sons had been killed.

"We were all running way because the army was firing on our village", he said.

"This act would also be in contradiction with the principle of "Non-Refoulement", which has been widely recognised as a principle of Customary International Law", the plea said, while seeking a direction to the government not to deport them and other members of Rohingya community.

"I will try to find money here".

Like this: